What's New at the Center?

  • The difference between an IQ score of 118 and an IQ score of 185 is profound. The difference is even more profound when the children are siblings and both have characteristics that indicate they are profoundly gifted. The developmental history of the particular siblings in this case revealed... read more

  • In the past few weeks, I have had the privilege of reviewing two new books from authors I admire.

  • In May, Linda Silverman’s book, Giftedness 101, was translated into Swedish. This led to a flurry of articles in Swedish newspapers, psychology journals and online media. Here is one of the interviews that emerged from this new interest in Sweden.

  • “The school psychologist stopped testing after our child scored high enough to get into the gifted program.” “We have been told that it doesn’t matter how high a child’s IQ score is, since there aren’t any programs in our school for highly gifted children.” “I don’t want to know my child’s IQ... read more

  • The visual-spatial learner construct came to me as I was trying to make sense of the puzzling behavior of some children during IQ testing. A 4 year old we tested is a good example. This profoundly gifted boy kept saying, “I don’t know” to every question. When he was coaxed, he got all the... read more

  • In 1979, Miriam Darnell created Druidawn, a fantasy role-playing game, designed to motivate students to write creatively. Druidawn teachers work online with small groups of 7- to 14-year-olds all over the world. These writing clubs help improve social skills, teamwork, and problem solving... read more

  • The great thing about being a VSL is that you can see the big picture, and just watch people to learn a new skill. Explore a range of options, and try to keep an open mind---noticing all the factors that are important to you...

  • Gifted people prefer complexity. We can turn the most mundane endeavor into an art form, a creative challenge, experimenting until we discover how to attain the most elegant, satisfying solution. Are we going for easy? Efficient? Time-saving? Of course not! Those are other people’s goals. We... read more

  • For most people, finding their purpose in life is a strong drive...it may be that yours will require a creative direction that uses those special VSL skills to unfold.

  • Many schools do not do a very good job of teaching anything but auditory sequential learners. Even the ones that do well in the primary grades will lose us around third grade, which is the most common time for VSLs to feel the gap.

  • Remember, your VSL gifts are ones that make you unique. At 15 you probably just want to "fit in" and have your life be a little easier; in the outside world of career and purpose, that creative spark is what will help you achieve innovation and excellence.

  • Gifted boys are often considered immature because they are sensitive and cry when hurt; in fact, that is typical of gifted boys because their sense of justice, perceptions and feelings are fine-tuned, so they are easily hurt.

  • It might take some research, but seeing your son excited about learning and motivated to expand his world, not to mention feeling good about his gifts, is a very empowering and rewarding experience.

  • It is very normal for children to have anxiety over unknowns, especially if they have previous unpleasant experiences in similar circumstances. Additionally, many children do not like any changes or surprises, and you should warn them before expecting a transition to a new activity (i.e., "In 10... read more

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