How to Turn on the Right Hemisphere

How to Turn on the Right Hemisphere

Linda Kreger Silverman, Ph.D.

 
  1. Use humor whenever possible: Humor gets the right hemisphere into the act.
  2. Present it visually. Use overheads. Draw pictures. Show them—don’t just tell them. Have them picture it.
  3. Use computers. Computers show rather than tell. They teach visually with no time limits.
  4. Make use of fantasy. Provide lots of opportunities for students to use their imaginations!
  5. Use hands-on experiences: manipulatives, construction, movement, action.
  6. Make it challenging. Challenge integrates the two hemispheres.
  7. Use discovery techniques: finding patterns, inductive learning, inquiry training.
  8. Put it to music. Let them sing it! Let them dance it! Let them chant it! Rhythm will be remembered.
  9. Get their attention! Talk louder, talk faster, be more animated, use gestures. Do something silly.
  10. Make them winners. Involve them in competition they are guaranteed to win: Read one more book than last week; Beat your record on times tables.
  11. Teach to their interests: find out what turns them on. What are their hobbies? What do they do after school? What do they want to be when they grow up?
  12. Emotion works wonders. Use emotionally charged material. Show them you care about them.
 
 
© Copyright held by Linda Kreger Silverman. From Silverman, L. K. (1993, Nov.) How to access the right hemisphere. Overhead presented at the Independent Schools Association National Conference, Indianapolis, IN. [An expanded version, under the title, "Instructional Strategies for Visual-Spatial Learners of All Ages," appears in Silverman, L.K. (2002). Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner (pp. 306-313). Denver: DeLeon.]